Theory

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To study your memory and sleep, use options available in SuperMemo in the following places:

Examples

Tools : Workload

You can use Tools : Workload (Ctrl+W) to inspect the daily and the monthly calendar of repetitions. You can view the number of repetitions scheduled, number of scheduled topics, number of scheduled items, as well as the record of past repetitions, and past retention, or how many new items were memorized.

Daily workload

SuperMemo: Tools : Workload : Daily tab showing the record of repetitions executed over a three-month period

Monthly workload

SuperMemo: Tools : Workload : Monthly tab showing the record of repetitions executed over a three-year period

Tools : Statistics : Analysis

You can use Tools : Statistics : Analysis (Shift+Alt+A) to inspect your forgetting curve, daily changes to your measured forgetting index, your learning overload, and many more:

Forgetting curve

SuperMemo: Tools : Statistics : Analysis : Forgetting Curves graphs for 20 repetition number categories multiplied by 20 A-Factor categories

Daily changes to the measured forgetting index

SuperMemo: Tools : Statistics : Analysis : Use : Efficiency : Forgetting index shows you the changes to the measured forgetting index on individual days

Priorities missed due to overload

SuperMemo: Tools : Statistics : Analysis : Use : Priority protection : Topics shows your actual processing capacity for high-priority topics on individual days

Tools : Statistics : Statistics

You can use Tools : Statistics : Statistics to supervise and understand your learning process:

SuperMemo: Statistics window that you can use to inspect the main learning parameters of your learning process

Tools : Statistics : Element data

You can use Tools : Statistics : Element data to inspect learning statistics of a given element:

Element data window after executing a repetition on an item about the Pascal programming language

Element menu : Learning : Show repetition history

You can use Learning : Show repetition history (Shift+Ctrl+H) (on the element menu) to inspect the history of repetitions for individual elements:

SuperMemo: Repetition history dialog box displaying the history of repetitions for the current element

Repetitions graph

Repetitions graph for any subsets of elements can be shown in the browser with Tools : Repetitions graph on the browser menu:

SuperMemo: Time flow of knowledge in the learning process

Figure: The horizontal axis corresponds with the repetition number and the vertical axis represents intervals (logarithmic scale). Despite a popular belief, the semi-log scale does not produce a linear graph here. Clearly the increase in the length of intervals slows down with successive repetitions. Moreover, the graph corresponding with zero lapses (red curve), results from the superposition of items with lower and faster increase in intervals (determined by difficulty). The bell-shaped curve is determined by all contributing items (below repetition number 10) and then only by difficult items or items with low forgetting index for which the increase in the length of intervals is significantly slower (above repetition 10). To see the above graph in your own collection, use Tools : Repetitions graph on the browser menu


Tools : Sleep Chart

You can use Tools : Sleep Chart (F12) to optimize the timing of your sleep as well as the timing of your learning:

Sleep and repetitions timeline

Inspect the timeline of repetitions and sleep:

SuperMemo: SuperMemo: Sleep and repetitions timeline displaying repetitions blocks of the current collection (in red) and sleep blocks (in blue)

Look for the best time for learning or sleep (see Sleep Chart for details):

SuperMemo: Sleep and repetitions timeline displaying repetitions blocks of the current collection (in red) and sleep blocks (in blue) with recomputed circadian approximations on the current data

Alertness

See how your brain gradually loses its power during the day:

SuperMemo: Tools : Sleep Chart : Alertness (H) graph makes it possible for you to visually inspect how grades decrease during the waking day. It also shows the impact of circadian factors with grades slightly lower immediately after waking and slightly higher after the mid-day dip in the 9th hour

Two-component sleep model

Look for the time of the day that should give you maximum learning power (Shift+click a day in the sleep timeline). See when your learning is not likely to be effective and when you should rather go to sleep:

SuperMemo: The predictions of the two-component sleep model about the homeostatic and circadian status of your alertness
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