Difference between revisions of "File:Circadian.jpg"

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Circadian graph plotting your favorite sleep times as counted from natural awakening (blue homeostatic line), as well as the resulting average sleep length produced by various retirement hours (red circadian line)
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Circadian graph plotting your favorite sleep times as counted from natural awakening (<span style="padding: 3px; color: white; background-color: blue;">blue homeostatic line</span>), as well as the resulting average sleep length produced by various retirement hours (<span style="padding: 3px; color: #FFF; background-color: red;">red circadian line</span>). The <span style="padding: 3px; color: #FFF; background-color: green;">slanting green line</span> separates the graph into the areas of phase advanced (right) and phase delays (left). The line is determined by points in the graph where the waking time (horizontal axis) added to the sleep time (left vertical axis) equals to 24.0 hours. The place where the <span style="padding: 3px; color: #FFF; background-color: green;">green breakeven line</span> crosses the <span style="padding: 3px; color: #FFF; background-color: red;">red sleep length line</span> determines the optimum balanced sleep cycle of 24 hours. The greater the angle between the <span style="padding: 3px; color: #FFF; background-color: green;">green</span> and <span style="padding: 3px; color: #FFF; background-color: red;">red</span> lines, the harder it is to balance sleep and fit it into the 24h cycle of the rotating earth. In the presented example, the longest sleep occurs after a 17-hour day, the best adjusted cycle happens after a 19-hour day, while the usual waking day lasts around 20 hours.

Revision as of 20:14, 16 November 2013

Circadian graph plotting your favorite sleep times as counted from natural awakening (blue homeostatic line), as well as the resulting average sleep length produced by various retirement hours (red circadian line). The slanting green line separates the graph into the areas of phase advanced (right) and phase delays (left). The line is determined by points in the graph where the waking time (horizontal axis) added to the sleep time (left vertical axis) equals to 24.0 hours. The place where the green breakeven line crosses the red sleep length line determines the optimum balanced sleep cycle of 24 hours. The greater the angle between the green and red lines, the harder it is to balance sleep and fit it into the 24h cycle of the rotating earth. In the presented example, the longest sleep occurs after a 17-hour day, the best adjusted cycle happens after a 19-hour day, while the usual waking day lasts around 20 hours.

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Date/TimeThumbnailDimensionsUserComment
current20:06, 16 November 2013Thumbnail for version as of 20:06, 16 November 20131,164 × 802 (249 KB)SuperMemoHelp (talk | contribs)
07:08, 7 August 2011Thumbnail for version as of 07:08, 7 August 20111,024 × 709 (221 KB)SuperMemoHelp (talk | contribs)Circadian graph plotting your favorite sleep times as counted from natural awakening (blue homeostatic line), as well as the resulting average sleep length produced by various retirement hours (red circadian line)
13:35, 6 July 2011Thumbnail for version as of 13:35, 6 July 20111,024 × 709 (221 KB)SuperMemoHelp (talk | contribs)Circadian graph plotting your favorite sleep times as counted from natural awakening (blue homeostatic line), as well as the resulting average sleep length produced by various retirement hours (red circadian line)
13:49, 4 May 2009Thumbnail for version as of 13:49, 4 May 20091,012 × 657 (215 KB)WikiSysop (talk | contribs)Circadian graph plotting your favorite sleep times as counted from natural awakening (blue homeostatic line), as well as the resulting average sleep length produced by various retirement hours (red circadian line)
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